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Seven Cities…………

November 19, 2009

Living in Delhi is so different from living in the U.S. for a million different reasons. One of the biggest reasons is simply the amount of history in the area. In the U.S., we marvel at what happened a few centuries ago – in Delhi, we walk among monuments that have existed for thousands of years. We hear stories that run through generations of rulers – sons who kill fathers and brothers to gain the throne and daughters and wives who manipulate events out of sight but never very far from the action. It is really the stuff that history is made of – and it rivals any soap opera that has ever been written.

There have been many rulers who tried to change the face of Delhi over the course of its history. Seven men who changed its name, its location, and its landscape. All of them wanted – and earned – their place on the pages of history. They are certainly gone – but they cannot be forgotten.

Every spring and every fall, a group of 40 people (this time it was all women but it isn’t always) gather to explore the seven original cities of Delhi – to retell the stories of the men and women who walked and ruled the areas that are now mostly static but were once alive with great splendor and pageantry. I had the good fortune to be one of those people this fall. The 40 participants are divided in to ten groups of 4. Each Wednesday, one of the groups gives a tour of one of the cities. This past week was my week and the group I was in presented Shajahanabad – Old Delhi. It was great fun.

Over time, I will share with you some of the information – and a lot of the pictures – I learned on the different tours. This is actually an amazing time to participate in 7 Cities because there is a big revitalization effort going on in Delhi to get ready for the Commonwealth Games in 2010. There has been lots of cleaning up going on.

The seven cities are as follows……

Quila Rai Pithora
Mehrauli
Siri
Tughlakabad
Firozabad
Shergarh
Shahjahanabad

And then finally New Delhi – which is heavily influenced by the British who ruled here for so long.

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. November 23, 2009 3:00 am

    Thanks Laura – I have thought of you often here – your travels to Sierra Leon and your jewelry! You would love the children here and the beads! 😎

  2. Laura permalink
    November 20, 2009 8:08 pm

    I have so enjoyed keeping up with your travels via your blog, and I’m so impressed at your dedication to truly experiencing this time in your life and sharing it with others. You’ve done so much research – your blog is wonderful, but you should also really think seriously about writing a book about your adventures – I hope it is something you’re seriously considering!

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