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When Pages Come Alive (part 2)………….

February 9, 2009

If you haven’t read When Pages Come Alive (part 1), you might want to start there.

Across this river is where Shah Jahan had intended to have his own mausoleum built. It was barely started. You can still see the outline of bricks – but not much more than that. He had intended to build it with all black stones. He wanted to connect the two buildings with a bridge. But it was not to be. (And, yes, Angel was tired of having her picture taken.)

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This next picture has nothing to do with the Taj Mahal – but there is a very nice man there who will help you feed the chipmunks. We gave him a little tip to say thank you. Yes, this is just like going to Disney and spending a day at the hotel pool – it is one of the things my kids will remember most about being in Agra.

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There are two identical buildings on either side of the Taj Mahal. They both look like this. If I remember right, one is for prayer and the other for ceremony. Don’t quote me on that.

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On to the Agra Fort. Only 20% of the fort is open to visitors. The remaining 80% is used by the military. The fort was built during the lives of 4 different rulers. One king had a grape garden for wine making. Yummy. Another king was married to three different women – a Hindu, a Muslim, and a Christian. Very open minded for a king from so long ago – well, minus the having three wives part.

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This is the chamber where Shah Jahan was imprisoned and the view of the Taj Mahal he was given.

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The ceiling in this room used to all be outlined in gold and looters took care of that . Sadly, this little section is all that is left.

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One last thing, this is how they clean the fort and the Taj Mahal. They spread mud on it and then clean off the mud. That makes perfect sense. And shhhh, don’t my kids that cleaning something by smearing it with mud first is an effective process. They can be literal thinkers, remember?

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Well that is our visit of the Taj Mahal and Agra Fort. There are surely a few little tidbits here and there that I have forgotten. So, I’ll probably write more later. If you have any quesitons, just ask me.

Oh yes, and the Agra fort has a lot of monkeys. Don’t get too close. Hell hath no fury like a monkey scorned.

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. February 10, 2009 1:57 am

    Anita – yes, our guide told us that Akbar was the only person ever buried at Agra. I did not know about the walls – we will try that when we go back.

    Lola – that monkey would love for you to come visit. 😎

    Jurate – it is definitely worth the trip – but try to read Beneath a Marble Sky first. It will make a difference.

  2. February 9, 2009 11:24 pm

    Beautiful pictures. I am still waiting for an opportunity to visit Agra. So many places to go to. I’ll make sure to read the book you recommended!

  3. February 9, 2009 10:38 pm

    Ahh, that monkey would be my friend in no time! Seriously, though, the photos are amazing. I’m not all that impressed by the chipmunk man, since I’ve got a chipmunk circus of my own, but the rest is just incredible.

    Oh, and the conversion of the money seems way out of control!

  4. Anita permalink
    February 9, 2009 10:30 am

    Glad to hear that you guys got there alright. Seems like you like it there so far. I can see how you felt when you saw the Taj Mahal. When I visited there with my family, summer ’08, all we could say was “WOW”!

    BTWT emperor Akbar’s (The guy that was married to a Hindu, Muslim and Jewish women) tomb just outside of Agra, It has a really cool communication feature. In the corridors outside, if you spoke/whispered into the pillars, you can actually hear the person through pillars several feet away! Don’t know if you guys went there! My kids thought it was absolutely cool!

    This building even has architecture and design features that signifies all three religions to represent the diversity of his harem! The guy even tried to establish a new religion “Din Illahi”, which incorporated teachings from all three (above said) religions, but didn’t quite take off.

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